Shotokan Karate Club      Taiyo-Tsuki-Klagenfurt

Training starts at 20.09.2016.

Changed training times on fridays!

Who we are

... a Shotokan Karate club We focus on kata and self-defense.

What we offer

... training sessions for everybody, also taking into account any physical limitations, moderate attendance fee.

Contact us

... by email or phone, or just drop by and join us!


We love what we do


We practice karate with heart and soul. Your training will also include a great deal of fun and enjoyment. Once you discover the fascination of this martial art, you won’t look back! We offer a sound, comprehensive training – you’re in the best of hands with us!

 

On the history of Karate

Karate Do means the path of empty hands.

There are different styles e.g. Gôjû-ryû, Wadô-ryû, Shitô-Ryû and Shotokan. The latter is characterised by powerful techniques and a low stance.

 

There are many myths about the origins of karate.  According to the literature, the most convincing story is that karate originated in the ancient Okinawan art of self-defence (Kara-te = empty hand) of the nobility, who were called the Shizokus. The first practitioners of karate were gathered together in the capital city of Shuri under King Sho Shin (1477-1526), but lived there virtually in captivity. The Shizokus did not possess any independent power of their own and served only to protect the King with their martial arts.

 

Later on, when the Ryûkyû Islands were occupied by the Japanese, a new arms weapons edict was passed. The carrying and ownership of weapons was forbidden, due to which the martial art of the Shizokus gained importance.

 

From 1724 onwards, the Shizokus left the capital city of Shuri and took their knowledge with them.


 

However, the techniques were at first not taught to the enslaved farmers in the countryside. It wasn’t until the 19th century that the people gradually adopted the martial art.  From that time on, karate started to become known outside Japan too.

 

From 1724 onwards, the Shizokus left the capital city of Shuri and took their knowledge with them. However, the techniques were at first not taught to the enslaved farmers in the countryside. It wasn’t until the 19th century that the people gradually adopted the martial art.  From that time on, karate started to become known outside Japan too.

 

Funakoshi, one of the first great teachers, said:

“The ultimate aim of karate lies not in victory or defeat, but in the perfection of the character of its participants.” His basic philosophical principle, "The path is the goal” and “Do not think of winning – rather, think of how not to lose” is still regarded as a basis of karate today.

 

Harmony of body and soul strengthens the personality.


I would like to thank the friends of our club for their professional translations!